About donbraisby

Artist's Statement My work is a record of an exploration of self and other, through passage and place. The narrative is articulated using the language of abstraction and metaphor. The final image is a shadow memory of the creative journey. The images that speak loudest to me are those found in ancient; cave and rock paintings, and the marks left in the landscape, around my home in North Wales, that record the decaying history of our industrial past. These images speak beyond culture and time. The finished work requires a viewer. The image demands to be seen, this is how it becomes alive. A new narrative is forged between the image and the viewer. The relationship developed between the image and viewer depends on the interplay and resonance between the image and the viewer’s memories, dreams and experiences. The title of a piece may direct the viewer to make a specific relationship with it. I prefer the relationship between the viewer and my work to be unmediated by titles; the ones I provide are merely my introduction of the image to the viewer.

John Grayson Workshop

Illustration is of a piece I made at the workshop led by John Grayson at the Ruthin Craft Centre 16th. March 2019.

John has spent the last five years researching Eighteenth-Century South Staffordshire Enamels to understand the crafts and skills used in their manufacture.The enamels were decorative objects such, as snuff boxes, and candlesticks. They were made from thin copper foil coated with layers of lustrous enamel.

In his research John examined the crafts used in their manufacture, focusing on the making of the copper substrate that gives each enamel its shape. In his workshop he demonstrated how the objects were constructed and the techniques used to make them. Participants then used the techniques to make and enamel a heart shaped box.

I came away from the workshop thinking that there is an area worth exploring in my own work of using electrotyped forms as substrates for enamelled sculptural objects. There is also a visual link in the box I made in the workshop and my interest in the Japanese traditional Oribi ceramics.

Stereotyping

Nineteenth century 3D printing, a process called stereotyping using electrolysis to make an exact copy of an object. The first picture is the artefact and the copper stereotype made of it. The second is of the mould made of it in latex. The mould is made conductive with graphite and placed in a frame to hold in place in the electrolysis tank. The electrolytic process plates the graphite with copper making a perfect copy of the original artefact.

 

New Electroplating Book

 

At last a twenty-first Electroplating in the home workshop can seem a daunting task due to the range of chemicals, the unfamiliar processes and the underlying chemistry involved. However, the results of a well-cleaned item and a well-maintained electrolyte are overwhelmingly impressive and, compared to sending parts to be industrially electroplated, are very cost effective. The practical advice given in Electroplating will provide you with the confidence and ability to create an electroplating tank of your own. This book will guide you through each of the processes and the equipment needed to start your own plating system and, alongside detailed step-by-step photographs and diagrams, provide instructions on their most effective use. Gateros Plating

Electrotyped Cast of a Workbench

As part of the Wrexham Print Centres Harts heath Project I have made an electrotyped plate of a workbench that was estimated as being first used in the early nineteenth century. Unfortunately I was only able to take an impression from a small part of it before the bench was removed to a museum. The image on the left is the reverse of the plate which is still attached to the mould and on the right is the part of the bench from which the impression was taken from.