About donbraisby

Artist's Statement My work is a record of an exploration of self and other, through passage and place. The narrative is articulated using the language of abstraction and metaphor. The final image is a shadow memory of the creative journey. The images that speak loudest to me are those found in ancient; cave and rock paintings, and the marks left in the landscape, around my home in North Wales, that record the decaying history of our industrial past. These images speak beyond culture and time. The finished work requires a viewer. The image demands to be seen, this is how it becomes alive. A new narrative is forged between the image and the viewer. The relationship developed between the image and viewer depends on the interplay and resonance between the image and the viewer’s memories, dreams and experiences. The title of a piece may direct the viewer to make a specific relationship with it. I prefer the relationship between the viewer and my work to be unmediated by titles; the ones I provide are merely my introduction of the image to the viewer.

Print from stereotype plate

This is one of the first prints off the stereotyped plate from earlier entries in my research blog. The plate was inked up using Hayter’s viscosity method, the second colour being silver, the first being cadmium  yellow deep hue . The plate is very heavily embossed, it has been through the press about twenty times and is holding out well and will certainly be good for a large edition if it was required.

opening walk

 

Stereotyped plate

P1020008

The final plate has 88g of deposited copper. It will require levelling off on the underside with fibre glass filler or a low temperature metal such as pewter. Three possibilities for inking up stand out, either viscosity printing, Andrew Baldwin’s double drop technique, or as a collagraph ‘a la poupee’ .

 

Stereotype progress

Over the last twelve hours a total of 37g has been deposited on the mandrel. The pure copper has a magical colour and to my eye it is an object of beauty in itself.

P1020004.jpg

I have used the stereotype process in the past to copy etching plates, this is the first time I have used it to make a plate with the intention of printing from it. This is the back of the plate that will need to be packed to prevent the soft copper from collapsing when it passes through the press. The plan is to continue the plating process for twelve to twenty-four hours.