Natural plinth

An old lump of concrete that looks like it has  spent many years in the sea was found on Abergele beach. Its colours and texture make it a natural fit with this electroformed pear.

Although the starting place for the research was focused on electro-etching for printmaking the use of electrolysis in making sculptural 3D objects is becoming an area of interest for me, especially after the visit to the Castle Fine Art Forge.

The research journey has been an interesting one. For me there has been a fusion of the research and the making of objects each process informing the other. In my artist statement I describe the idea of the two journeys, the inner and outer that I believe happen in the making of art objects. This could be mistaken as meaning that my work is process driven, that is the creative journey is more important than the product. In the production of this object the narratives of all three are important and are fused into it. The narratives of the two journeys, and the two objects that are now one, encompass constant change. As an art object it is a still life and as such is a reminder of death in life.

Electrometallurgy sculpture easier and cheaper to do at home than lost wax.

The electro forming of sculpture has a number of advantages over the lost wax process, the major one being that the sculptor can do it in a home studio.

This piece is 30 cm. high.

The whole process took less than twenty four hours.

Investigating electroforming

In the 1860’s Charles Walker’s book “Electrotype Manipulation” ran into thirty editions. In 1868 Alexander Watt reported that;

‘Everyone has his set of electrotyping apparatus and his bath of copper sulphate. Even among the fair sex will be found many skilful manipulators and in such hands, how could the art fail to give beautiful results.’

Some earlier posts describe the processes of electro forming and electrotyping and the differences between them.

Examples of apples and pears that I have electroformed.

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